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The White Noise

The hero lies within all of us.

Allied Feathers and Peak Performance teamed up for a new type of climate change film – WHITE NOISE. Follow Los Angeles musician and model Clinton Van Arnam through urban ruins and on to Arctic glaciers as he listens, studies, monitors and records the sounds of the retreating glaciers.

As both brands are concerned with the wellbeing of our planet, and are advocates for its exploration and conservation without sacrificing fashion, style, and an increasingly urban lifestyle, we felt that working together would provide a synergy and increased energy beyond the capacity of any individual. We care about the same wild places, are inspired by the same trails and rugged mountain passes, hang out on the same streets and respect the breadth of stories brought to life there.

"We have known the facts for years. Climate change is very real and our role is also clear. There are countless sources, websites, media stories and documentaries that deal with the facts and present to us always increasing data in hopes that something will register. But we are also confronted with becoming anesthetized with the excess of this information. Jean Baudrillard eloquently wrote that the excess of signs and meaning has paradoxically caused an effacement of reality. This is the world we live in today unfortunately. The easily available and ubiquitous climate change data is its own worst enemy allowing confusion, distance and misunderstanding at best; and at worst, a complete denial.

There is now a need for another way to look at and interpret all this data that has been collected. Simple figures and facts do not resonate. We are not connected to numbers. And scientists are admittedly not storytellers.
It is time to use this “data” to build a very personal and intimate story. Art and music have long been arbiters of progressive thoughts and actions, and by using these mediums perhaps climate change activism can take on a new life by exploring our interconnectedness to the nature and humanizing the ice.

WHITE NOISE uses the data of climate change and presents it in a new emotional, modern and engaging way to build a more intimate connection between this information and the viewer. With no narration or presentation of facts, the result is purely emotional. It’s time to rethink how climate change is represented so we all feel more connected to it. In a sense, WHITE NOISE is a call to action. A call for each and every one of us to look at how our actions help alter the soundtrack of change so we can look to the future and focus on what we can do to make a positive difference.

Real change can only happen if we all feel the need deep within ourselves. Perhaps it is not too late to think a little different about how our actions are affecting the environment we live in. WHITE NOISE should be seen as a beacon of possibility and hope within a critically important time demonstrating the connection we all have to nature - and each other - so that we can all do our small part to make a very large global difference.


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The WHITE NOISE team has been working with leaders in the scientific community that have collected the visual and audio data for decades to rethink how this data has traditionally been packaged via the media. Arctic and Antarctic climatologists have been studying glacial decay through sonograms of the seismic activity and the results are haunting - the ice is literally screaming as it cracks and withers away.

Using this type of data as an “instrument” and scoring with sounds recorded on and inside of the glacier creates not just different data, but a new type of experience - the data becomes music. The information already tells a story as it is, it simply needs to be framed into an experiential, compelling, poetic, modern and aesthetically relevant story to reach a generation that has already grown apathetic to “the numbers.”

The film itself follows Los Angeles musician, Clinton Van Arnam, through a journey of discovery - both personally and poetically. He finds himself in a community abandoned due to the rising coastal waters and is haunted by the sounds and visual impact of climate change. Summoned to the retreating glacial plains, he feels, captures, and interprets the voices of the ice as he builds their whispers, cries, screams and monologues into a hauntingly beautiful score becoming both a Requiem and rallying cry for - and from - the ice.
Visually, Clinton is portrayed as a hero-protagonist and a representation of the climate change refugee - a new type of warrior seeking strength from the landscape and finding the power of acting within. As he traverses the ice, he is followed by his drone counterpart similarly recording his movements. The protagonist becomes subject from the point of view of this instrument of the future. The realization is clear. He is just as much part of the ice as the sounds he is recording.

We are intimately connected to the world around us and every action for and against it is equal to the same for or against us. In a world that demands action now, perhaps the most important one is also the simplest. Contemplation is many times the most effective weapon.
Full documentary coming soon over at whitenoisefilm.com